Fixing a Synology DS1515+ not powering on

A few days ago my old Synology DS1515+ that I gave a friend wouldn’t power up. Press the power button and not a single thing would happen, no fans or lights would come on – not even for a second.

I started looking around and found there to be three common issues with several of the DSxx15 units:

  1. Dead motherboard battery
  2. Intel Atom C2000 bug
  3. Dead B847B transistor

Good stuff right?! Well luckily it’s not nearly as bad as it might sound at first and all three are pretty easy to fix.

Items needed to repair the DS1515

The first thing I did was remove the cover from the Synology NAS and tested the power supply and everything checked out fine on the PSU.

Next I moved on to the transistor since it was the next closest and easiest item to get to. Using a multi-meter and setting it to 10 AMP I put the leads on the center and bottom pins as shown here:

Synology DS1515+ NAS transistor
Set multi-meter to 10amp and check these pins

The good news is, immediately the DS1515+ powered on. So the next step was to remove the motherboard from the chassis so I could de-solder the old transistor and solder a new transistor in it’s place and I figured while I had it removed I would go ahead and address the other two known issues, more as a precautionary and so I wouldn’t have to take it apart again.

Below is a “map” of the points of interest on the Synology DS1515+ motherboard that we’ll be focusing in on.

Once I had the motherboard removed from the chassis. I replaced the factory CR1220 battery with a new Energizer CR1220 battery.

Next up I solder the 100 ohm resistor in place as shown below. This resistor is said to fix the Intel Atom C2000 bug and the same fix that was being done by Synology back when these units still in their warranty period.

Now it was time to actually fix the root cause of this whole thing and that was to replace the failed transistor. Using a heat gun and some small pliers I removed the bad transistor.

With the old transistor removed I soldered on a new BC847B transistor just as the old one had been installed.

Finally, the only thing left to do it to reassemble the the NAS. Everything checked out fine and is fully operational now.

All in all the total cost was around $15! A lot better option than buying a brand new unit.

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27 Comments

  1. Great tip! It worked for my 2 NAS that stopped booting: 1513+ and 1515+. Very happy that I could solve this problem with an investment of 15€ which is most shipping costs of the very cheap components.

  2. Mike what a terrific and concise article!
    I purchased my DS1515+ in 2016 and Synology replaced due to Intel flaw – I don’t recall which one. Mine recently started rebooting every few days, usually at night. I have also had issues with network adapter dropping off. I removed my motherboard tonight, replaced the BIOS battery, and put the original RAM back in. An engineer told me he had one and upgraded to the 2 sticks of 8GB DDR3L 1600 1.35V CL11 like I did, and it caused him all sorts of problems in the long run. I’ve had none until recently, but Synology’s troubleshooting pages stated that could be one of causes.
    I noticed that my board (same info on board as the one in your picture) does not have the resistor that you mention in the article. Would it be advisable to add it?
    I do not have problems starting up. Should I replace the transistor, even though I’m not having issues? I’m usually into preventative maintenance, but that seems like overkill (at the moment, anyway).
    After this amount of time I’m willing to try things that make sense, but still suspect the power supply. I wish I had a way to test under load at home.
    Thank you!

    1. Ian,

      If you don’t already have the 100ohm resister in place, then I would absolutely add it while you have it apart. This is a known bug in the CPU and it’s really just a matter of time before it shows it’s face.

      -Michael

      1. Thank you Mike. I’ll do that tomorrow. After reading through the articles linked off of your Intel Atom C2000 bug link, it makes sense (and looks like it certainly wouldn’t hurt). In the meantime, I found the power supply Manufacturer, Model, and Rev is extremely common and in use in LOTS of NAS and DVR systems. For those who wish to do some digging, they can be had very, very affordably and seem to be in stock everywhere. After 5 years of 24/7 service, I opted to replace that as well, rather than the whole NAS. Synology used a lot of top-tier components in these systems, so I figure that I could get at least another 5 years out of my investment.

    2. I updated mine to 16 GB of DDR3L Ram with no problem. You can always remove one stick and test them alternately. Test whether it’s one or the other.

  3. Hello MIke,
    I am in the same boat with my 1515+. It no longer will boot up. If I take another ATX 24pin Power Supply and hook it up to the 1515+ board, it boots up no problem, however I cannot get the hard drives to boot because I don’t have another PS with an (8 & 12pin) connector. I added the resistor but did not solder it as I don’t have an iron. I also added the new battery. For the transistor for the Q2 portion of the board, I never soldered a transistor before, and don’t have a solder iron, do you have any step by step instruction how to do that? Is there another way to take off the old transistor and add a new one?

      1. Mike, I found a supplier on eBAY – about $70. After making the mods, it would not boot up. They’re sending me another PSU – Delta DPS-250AB-44B Rev.4. In the meantime, I’m going to use a standard ATX PSU to try to get this board going and leave the 8 and 12 pin powered from the original until I have time to figure out the specs on each wire. Hoping this bugger comes back, even if I have to continue run it on ATX PSU. From what I’ve been reading, the small Deltas can be part of the problem – even if you pay $180 for them.

  4. Just ordered the parts for my out of warranty 1515+. Already has the 100ohm resister fix. Hopefully this will stop the improper shutdowns.

    Any idea as to how long this fix works? Probably going to move to a 1520+, regardless.

    Hopefully this will help with keeping a secondary NAS.

  5. Hey, great and thank you. My 1515+ didn’t die yet, but I actually got reminded of this – it just powered down unexpectedly a few times, no logs. It is a RMA’d one, but the hardware fixes are missing. And – I got 2 1517+ that would need attention, apparently – all of them host rather convenient (if not to say critical) things. For the 1517+ I need to find out if they have some of the hardware patches integrated into the PCB. The available information is a bit ambiguous.

  6. Mike, Just wanted to thank you for this fix. When I went through the steps I found the 1/4 ohm resister had already been added at the factory. Just in case, I went ahead and replaced everything in your directions anyway. I was bit apprehensive since I never did any soldering on a board before. So my cost was a bit higher since I had to purchase a soldering iron and a few other things but it was still substantially lower then a new NAS but it was also educational and fun especially when it worked. The culprit, for me , was the B847B transistor. I tested after each step and that was the last thing I replaced since it seamed the most tedious.

    Thanks again Mike
    — Howard

  7. Replaced the transistor and my 1515+ came back to life. Thanks for the article. Wish Synology would have offered a permanent fix after these 3 issues but I guess these are built to fail rather than repair.

  8. Thank you for saving my Synology 1515+ NAS! Fantastic information and well provided! The photos were a great help! A new battery and one tiny transistor and we are back in business. My unit had been swapped once under warranty so it already had the resistor in place. Thank you again for taking time to post such a useful article!

  9. Mike! This helped me tremendously!! It got me to bite the bullet and actually use the soldering gear I had to good use. I followed the instructions and I’m back and running. I had bought the NAS and 5 x 6TB all at the same time. The next thing I have to replace are the hard drives. I’m not looking forward to that:( Hope fully I can save up to get a whole set of them before they die. I really appreciate the information!

  10. Mike many, many thanks this really helped me in repairing an ailing DS1515+. The easy to follow steps and links to components tipped the balance for me to even take the task on, and proved invaluable in getting it through to completed. I would add for myself, hardest part was removing the transistor in situ, for which I ended up stopping for a couple of days whilst a Chipquik SMD removal kit was ordered and shipped. That did the job although only after lots of flux and trying the wedge shaped solder tip, which heated the desoldering alloy / solder enough to work its magic.
    From the gradual decline of random power offs to eventual no power at all, the 3 repairs you provide came good and the unit is now running 24 hours so far without any issue at all. Fantastic result for £30 versus the cost of a new 5 bay NAS. Again thanks for taking the time to record your repair so well for others!!

      1. That’s great news and thanks for the link.

        The DS1515+ that I repaired for this post has been going rock solid ever since. I believe we’re going to get a lot longer life out of these units now. Be sure to let me know if you do have any issues as I would be interested in hearing about it.

        Thanks,

        -Michael

  11. Thank you for the excellent article. I did the resistor patch and a new battery since mine was below .2 volts and the last thing was the transistor. Once I replaced the transistor, bingo! I now have power and saved myself over $500 for a replacement NAS. Thank you very much for the information. Saved my buns.